Tag Archives: ski snow

Goode carbon race skis take podiums at USSA Masters Nationals

Goode’s soon-to-be-released line of new carbon fiber race skis captured multiple top-five finishes at the USSA Masters Nationals last weekend in Big Sky, Mont.

On the strength of fourth and fifth place finishes in giant slalom and super-G, respectively, Tim Itin finished third overall in the Men’s 6 division.  In Women’s 7, Dawn Goode took second place in downhill, fourth in both super-G and giant slalom, and fifth overall.
Dawn Goode charges Big Sky.

“I was really excited to see Tim and Dawn ski so well on our new race skis,” said Dave Goode president and founder of Goode Skis.  “Dawn’s downhill ski was just built on Friday and then to have her podium just a few days later was truly exciting.  Then to watch Tim podium in the overall capped off a great week of racing.”

The big results come after Dawn earned two giant slalom victories during the season-long Jan’s Cup Series and both Dave and Dawn taking second place in their respective divisions at the USSA Masters Intermountain races held at Snowbasin resort in Utah.

Goode Skis is the first and only company building pure carbon fiber race skis.  The skis are expected to become widely available this fall.

Dealer profile: Lee Quaglia and Aspen East

For more than 30 years, Lee Quaglia and his shop, Aspen East, have been welcoming skiers and boarders to Killington with a huge inventory of top-of-the-line products, expert technical know-how, great customer service, and for the last 20 years, GOODE carbon fiber ski poles.

We recently had a chance to talk with Lee about his shop, how the 2012/2013 season is shaping up, why he’s carried GOODE products for so long, and what his customers like about them. Here is our conversation:

GOODE: Killington has been open for a few weeks, how’s the season looking so far for Aspen East?

Lee: So far it’s OK. It started out very well and every two to three days we’ve seen new trails open. Killington has made a commitment to snowmaking this year that they have not done the past three or four years, so it’s really a much better early season effort.

GOODE: Are the long-range forecasts calling for more snow at Killington this year?

Lee: Well I think the best forecast would be to check back with me in April and I could tell you how it went. The Weather Channel and National Weather Service seem to say that we’ll have an average snow year. That would certainly be better than last year, which was the worst year I’ve seen in 40 years of doing this.

GOODE: A lot of shops had tough times last year because of poor snow totals, but not many also had to deal with a tropical storm that cut you off from the rest of the world for a period of time. How did Irene impact you last year?

Lee: It was a disaster in the beginning because we had no road to the west for 2-1/2 miles and to the east there was a gap of about a quarter mile, so we couldn’t have any tractor trailers or deliveries for 19 days until that opened and even then it was a single-lane, makeshift road.

At first, people thought Vermont was completely closed, and then we had a resurgence around Thanksgiving. But then the season went down the drain and it really never snowed. There is nothing you can do about that.

GOODE: You’ve carried GOODE carbon poles for more than 20 years now, why have you been so loyal to them?

Lee: We ran into Dave Goode when he just had one or two different types of poles in the very beginning at a trade show at Stratton Mountain. I picked up the pole and I went ‘wow this is totally different than anything out there.’ Basically the pole game is either that it’s a high-end pole that only a few people buy, or it’s a down-and-dirty-pole that someone buys with a package or it’s just something they need at that moment.

GOODE poles really address an overview of everybody who can appreciate the feeling and quality of a high-end pole and they last forever. Nothing ever goes wrong with them. The only reason anybody would probably buy another set is because theirs got stolen.

GOODE: What are the poles’ key benefits?

Lee: The No. 1 benefit, especially with the higher-end poles, is that the grip is adjustable. It goes up three or four inches, which is basically the depth of the physical grip itself. For example, if you buy a 50-inch pole, it’ll go down to 47 inches. So you spin it down to 47 inches and then you say, ‘you know it’s too short, I want it at 48 inches,’ you haven’t committed to cutting the pole. You can just thread it back up, lock it off and away you go.

And especially when you go into the higher-end poles, there is a much lighter swing weight and easier throw to them. So for someone who is really a skiing purest, or is looking for something that’s certainly better than the average aluminum pole, GOODEs stand out. And because they are made of carbon, there is a flex to the shaft of the pole that really takes some of the shock you’re your elbow and arm. If you are an Eastern skier who is planting that pole over and over again on hard pack or icy conditions, anything that takes the shock out of your arm and wrists is a good thing.

GOODE: What kind of feedback do you get back from customers who’ve bought GOODE poles?

Lee: I think the best feedback is that they continue to buy GOODE poles and don’t switch to another brand. When they do buy a new pole, they either go for the same one they’ve had or maybe upgrade to another GOODE pole.

GOODE: Your shop has really embraced internet retailing. How much of a part of the business is it for you?

Lee: Here at Aspen East we have two online stores: AspenEast.com and SurftheEarthSnowboards.com. Surf the Earth is the snowboard section and Aspen East is ski. We’ve been doing this for over ten years and each year we’ve seen increases with them. It’s kept us moving forward as opposed to either just hanging on or losing market share.

GOODE: From a retailer’s standpoint, what are the challenges facing the industry right now?

Lee: One major challenge is the weather, because it didn’t snow in the big cities last year, Boston and New York, so out of site out of mind. You always think that if they are blowing snow the skiing is good, and that’s true if you are here locally. But if you are the guy sitting there in New York City and it’s 55 degrees, you are not getting that heads up to go skiing no matter how much advertising is being done.

Also, with the immediacy of smartphones and all the new technology that is out there, people are just not committing to that two to four, six-week ahead of time reservation that they did even a few years ago. They are waiting for the optimum last minute to pull the trigger to come on a specific weekend or when they have the time off. It’s a challenge at best.

GOODE: You’ve twice been named New England Shop of the Year by Skiing Magazine. What’s your secret to success?

Lee: First of all we are very fortunate to be in a highly populated ski area and have a lot of people that come in and out of here, as opposed to being maybe only a very good shop without a lot of people coming in and out. We have a population base going for us. Second, we’re on the main east/west corridor of Vermont, Route 4 and Route 100 and we’re in Killington which is the major ski area centrally located in the middle of the state. It’s very easy to get here, five hours from New York, three hours from Boston.

We try to offer as many things as we can to basically a higher-end person, not necessarily money wise, but someone who is committed to the sport because they are a snow lover and we understand that. Everybody who works here either skis or rides or both and they are out there five, six, seven days a week enjoying their sport.

GOODE snow skis earn major magazine awards

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GOODE is getting some major magazine love as four of its snow skis have won awards from SKI and Skiing magazines.

“I’ve always thought that what our customers tell us about our skis is the most important kind of feedback we get,” said Dave Goode, founder and president of GOODE Skis, “but having testers from SKI and Skiing magazines like our skis so much is pretty great too.  It’s just more confirmation that all of the hard work we’ve put into designing, testing and building great skis is paying off.”

The Fire earned honors from both magazines, scoring a Gold Medal Gear designation from SKI and an Official Selection from SkiingSKI’s reviewers liked the Fire’s lightweight finesse and pop, labeling the ski “sporty and snappy.”  It took the top score in the Men’s mixed west classification in both the quickness and forgiveness categories, and tied for second in rebound.  Skiing says the Fire “absolutely torches corduroy” and that its carbon construction allows skiers “to relax on this ski and still go effing fast.”  Skiing wrapped up its review by saying that the Fire is “a great all-mountain tool with a traditional feel perfect for race-bred folks.” Reviews: SKI | Skiing

Citing its softer flexes that make it more manageable and its smooth ride in rough snow, Skiing awarded GOODE’s women’s freestyle ski, the  Affinity, with an Official Selection honor.  Testers gave the ski high marks in stability at speed, maneuverability, hard snow performance and forgiveness.  Review: Skiing

The Impact earned a Gold Medal Gear award in SKI’s Men’s mixed snow east, a category of skis that require good edge grip on account of the East’s generally colder, icier conditions.  Like the Fire, the Impact got rave reviews for its quickness and rebound, earning the category’s highest combined marks in these areas.  SKI summed up the Impact by saying that it’s “light, lively and fun.” Review: SKI

In the powder ski category, the Rahu earned an Official Selection award from Skiing.  Testers cited its “distinctly traditional feel” that “hooks firmly into turns and holds steady throughout.”  They also loved how the Rahu offers “on-piste precision” and “off-piste agility.”  Review: Skiing

To learn more about GOODE’s entire award winning 2012/2013 lineup, click here.

Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow!

The American West has been hit by a massive early season snow storm and Utah’s Wasatch Mountains are no exception. Here’s a shot taken this morning of Snowbasin, site of the 2002 Olympic Downhill and Super G, and due to its 20-mile distance from HQ, the home resort of sorts for GOODE Skis.