Tag Archives: Chet Raley

Tight match ups half way through first round of the GOODE Bracket Challenge

Half way through the first round of the GOODE Virtual Water Ski Bracket ChallengeTM two brackets are all tied up and the other two are close.

Here’s how the March Madness on water stands as of July 16th:

  • No. 1 Todd Ristorcelli vs. No. 8 Jay Leach: Tied at 2 buoys at 41-feet off.
  • No. 2 Dave Miller vs. Chad Scott: Tied at 2-1/2 buoys at 41-feet off.
  • No. 3 Ben Favret vs. Regina Jaquess:  An upset brewing in this one as Regina has a one-and-a-half buoy lead on Ben, courtesy of her pending world record of 3-1/2 buoys at 41-feet off.
  • No. 4 Chet Raley vs. No. 5 Kyle Tate: A mild upset in the works as Kyle (1-1/2 buoys at 41-feet off) has a half buoy edge on Chet.

With two weekends and both the Southern and South Central regional championships left in July, there is still plenty of time for participants to put up some big scores.

Round 1′s bracket selection contest closed for entries on July 12th, but everyone will have another chance to enter and win when Round 2 begins in August.

Click here to learn more about the bracket challenge.

Pick ‘em and win with the Goode Bracket Challenge

We are very excited to announce the Goode Virtual Water Ski Bracket ChallengeTM, a tournament featuring eight of the best 34 MPH skiers facing off virtually in a head-to-head bracket to determine a champion.  Think March Madness on the water.

The contestants? Oh, just Todd Ristorcelli, Chad Scott, Ben Favret, Chet Raley, Kyle Tate, Dave Miller, Jay Leach … and the Women’s slalom world record holder Regina Jaquess!  See the seedings and brackets below.

Fans Play Along!

Fans can get involved by picking who they think will advance in each round.  We’ll hold a contest each round in which every contestant that picks that round’s winners correctly will be entered into a drawing for a Goode prize package. The prizes are:

To enter the Round 1 contest, click here and fill out your picks on or before July 12th. Look for entry details for the second and final rounds as the summer progresses.

Only one entry per round, per person. But, if you follow our Twitter account and tweet your picks with @GoodeSkis and #GoodeBracket in the message we’ll award you with a second entry.

How It Works

The virtual tournament has three rounds: rounds of 8, 4 and 2 competitors.  In each round a higher seed will face off against a lower seed (seeds determined by IWWF ranking). It’s “virtual” because the first two rounds will use scores from any AWSA and/or Water Ski Canada tournaments the competitors ski in during the months of July (round of 8) and August (round of 4).

At the end of the month, the skier that has the single highest score from any AWSA- or Water Ski Canada-sanctioned tournament (regardless of sanctioning class) will win that bracket and advance.  In other words, during the first two rounds skiers won’t ski head-to-head at the same tournament, we’ll just use their scores from that month to determine the winner.

While the first two rounds will each take place virtually over many weeks, the final round will be a live head-to-head face off at a record-capability tournament we are hosting on Sept. 10 and 11, at Goode Ski Lake in Ogden, Utah.

Enter the contest here.

Chet Raley talks Juniors, skis and keeping up with the Big Dawgs

Chet Raley has long been one of water skiing’s most sought-after coaches … and he’s a pretty good skier himself.  Goode Skis recently spoke with Chet about two of the brightest young students he coaches at his Palm Beach Training Center, the ski he’s riding on and how he’s been able to do more than just hang with the younger Big Dawgs.

Two of your students, Yiannis Nathanail and Samantha Dumula, just won Junior world titles.  How does that accomplishment stack up with some of the other things you’ve achieved in the sport?

I don’t really take credit for kids’ or students’ accomplishments because that is their hard work. I work hard with them but their success is theirs.  It’s beautiful though and very, very rewarding to watch them try as hard as they try and have good things come to fruition.

Now that they’ve both experienced their first taste of success at the world level, what can we expect from them in coming years?

With both Yiannis and Samantha the sky is absolutely the limit. They are very bright, very smart kids that both have incredible parents that should get as much credit as anyone.  They have the potential to do whatever they want, but school is going to be a major priority for both. But they can go as far as they want to go in skiing.

You’ve been skiing on the new NANO ONE since last summer and have put a lot of your students on the ski.  What do you like about it?

First of all, it’s the best Goode ever created, no question about it.  You can make almost any ski functional, but to make it more superior than anything else it has to be really good. And it’s a superior product. The addition of inserts is really cool and a lot of people have clamored for that for a long time, but that’s secondary to the way it performs. It has two good sides, which is not normal for skis of the last 10 years or so.

You’ve skied on many different Goodes in the past. How does this ski compare and contrast to those others?  

Pro skiers are good about keeping a wet ski and in other sports that’s important too. The more of that edge you put into the snow, ice or water the better control you have.  None of the other skis set an edge better than this ski and that is worth its weight in gold.

Like any sport, water skiing in continuously evolving. What new concepts or thoughts are you incorporating into your coaching?  

It evolves almost yearly, and I’d say dramatically each year. The idea of skiing from buoy to buoy has really changed.  That’s the net result, but there is a lot of interest in skiing from the apex near the buoy to the wake right now. Deliberately setting an edge that sustains angle that culminates in the center line behind the boat.  It’s a much nicer way to ski than the old days of turning, stalling, grabbing the line and pulling like a mad man to gain back your losses.

The Big Dawg series seems to get tougher and tougher each year yet you are always at or near the top.  How have you been able to stay so competitive even while new talent has entered the series?

Well, you better continue to change, evolve and learn if you want to keep up.  As an old man (Editor’s note: Chet is 56) in a young man’s sport, you just continue to keep it up and not sit around and think that you have it all figured out. You have to evolve with better equipment and you have to work hard, just like the kids I coach do.