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Regina’s new world record of 3-1/2 at 41 off approved by the IWWF

Regina Jaquess’ pending Women’s world slalom record of 3-1/2 buoys at 41-feet off has been approved buy the IWWF’s tournament council. (Watch her record-breaking performance here.)

Set while riding the 2017 Nano 1 on November 5th at the Isles Junior Invitational at the Isles of Lake Hancock in Winter Garden, Fla., the new record surpasses Regina’s own world record of 3-1/4 buoys at 41 feet off she set in 2014.

The new record is her seventh world slalom record of her career, with her first coming in 2009.

 

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GOODE skiers medal at Pan American Championships

Javier Julio (l), Jeff Surdej (c) and Blaze Grubbs.

From the Open ranks to the Under 13 divisions, GOODE skiers peppered the slalom and overall podiums throughout last week’s Pan American Championships, held in Boca Laguna Mexico.

The Championships featured nine teams from North, Central and South American competing in Open, Under 21, Under 17 and Under 13 divisions.

GOODE skiers taking home golds were Felipe Miranda (Open Men overall), Javier Julio (35+ Men slalom), Jeff Surdej (35+ Men overall), Lori Krueger (45+ Women slalom and overall) and Mark Stevens (45+ Mens slalom), while Regina Jaquess (Open Women slalom and overall), Jenna Morgan (Under 21 Women slalom and overall), Dorien Llewellyn (Open Men overall), and Kristy Kraus (35+ Women slalom) earned silver medals. Blaze Grubbs (Under 13 Boys slalom and overall), and Rodrigo Miranda (Open Men overall) earned bronzes. Surdej and Stevens also picked up a bronze medal in 35+ Men slalom and silver in 45+ Men overall, respectively.

Here’s how the team competitions ended up:

  • Open – Gold: Canada; Silver: United States; Bronze: Chile
  • Under 12 – Gold: United States; Silver: Colombia; Bronze: Chile
  • Under 17 – Gold: Canada; Silver: Argentina; Bronze: United States
  • Under 21 – Gold: United States; Silver: Canada; Bronze: Mexico
  • 35+ – Gold: United States; Silver: Canada; Bronze: Mexico
  • 45+ – Gold: United States; Silver: Canada; Bronze: Mexico

For team and overall results, click here. For full results, click here.

It’s difficult to track so many skiers over the course of six days of action, so if we failed to include you as a GOODE skier in the list above, or mistakenly did so, please accept our apologies and email us the details at team@goode.com.

Regina sets pending world record of 3-1/2 at 41 off

As if to put an exclamation mark on another dominating season, Regina Jaquess set a new pending world record at this weekend’s Isles Junior Invitational at the Isles of Lake Hancock in Winter Garden, Fla.

Riding the 2017 Nano One, Regina scored 3-1/2 buys at 41-feet off to top her own current mark by a quarter buoy.

If approved by the International Waterski & Wakeboard Federation’s Tournament Council, it will be her seventh world slalom record, her first coming in 2009.

Brooke Baldwin runs 39; sets new Girls 3 record

Less than a month after the American Water Ski Association approved her tie of the Girls 3 national slalom record, Brooke Baldwin upped the record by three full buoys and in the process became the youngest female skier ever – by a large margin – to run 39 off.

Brooke scored 1 buoy at 41-feet off at Saturday’s Isles Junior Invitational at the Isles of Lake Hancock in Winter Garden, Fla., to set a new pending Girls 3 record and become the eighth female ever to run 39 in a sanctioned tournament.

At 16 years old, it is believed that Brooke beat the previous “youngest ever” into 41 off mark by more than five years.

GOODE skiers top newly released IWWF world rankings

The latest International Water Ski and Wakeboard Federation world rankings are out and filled with GOODE skiers.

Team GOODE skiers dominate the Open Women rankings, with seven of the top 10: 1) Regina Jaquess; 4) Brooke Baldwin; 5) Karen Truelove; 6t) Clementine Lucine; 8) Kate Adriaensen; 9) Ambre Franc; and 10) Breanne Dodd.

In Open Men, Thomas Degasperi (5), Brian Detrick (6), Adam Sedlmajer (12) and Benjamin Stadlbaur (14) all make the top-15.

In the Junior ranks, Brooke tops both the Under 21 and Junior Women rankings, while Dane Mechler is No. 1 in Under 21 Men.

Karen Truelove (35+ Women), Dave Miller (45+ Men), Joy Kelley (55+ Women), and Steve Raphael (65+ Men) all top their respective Senior lists.

Click here for the complete listings.

Q&A with U.S. Open slalom champ Adam Sedlmajer

Two-time World Overall Champion Adam Sedlmajer picked up a major career milestone earlier this fall by winning the Men’s slalom title at the U.S. Open, topping a tough field in the process.

GOODE Skis recently caught up with Adam to talk about the big win, how it changes the way he views slalom and his return to Team GOODE.

You are probably best known in water skiing as a two-time World Overall champion. Do you think this win will change how people view you and your skiing?

I am not sure that one win can change that, but I think maybe people will think of me more as a slalom skier and podium contender.

Does it change how you view slalom?

Slalom has always been my strongest event and one that I commit more time to. I know I still have room to improve and have been shifting more towards slaloming lately. Overall is cool, but slalom is the way to go for me.

Your winning score of 3 at 41 is a huge score, but you were second off the dock in the finals with a pretty stacked field to follow. What was your immediate thought about that score, and how did it feel as skier after skier failed to match it?

The whole weekend was an emotional roller coaster. Skiing on Friday not knowing whether I’d be in the finals due to the rain delays. Then I almost ended up in a run off, and with Will going down around one ball I made it into the finals with Martin without the need of a run off. The finals were crazy too. I knew that 3 at 41 off was a solid score that could put me on a podium, but my back-up score wasn’t so great, so there was some doubt. Watching everyone skiing was definitely not easy, especially since everyone ran 39 off. Lots of emotions, especially at the end.

About a week before the U.S. Open you took a bad jump crash, knocking you out of jump and overall at the U.S. Open. How did that affect your slalom training leading up to the event?

I took a couple of days off and took my first slalom ride the Tuesday before the event. After running two passes I had to go in because my neck was still very sore from the whiplash. My next set of the week was the preliminary round. But I honestly believe it helped me relax and just focus on the keys I’ve been working on the whole season. Sometimes things happen for a reason and I am glad it worked out.

You were on Team GOODE a few years back but migrated to another brand for awhile. But this year you came back. What motivated you to start slaloming on GOODEs again?

Things just weren’t as consistent as I wanted them to be. Especially before the Worlds last year. So I decided to kind of reinvent myself this year by going back to the basics and back to the things I knew worked in the past.

How does ending the year with a big win like this change your outlook heading into the 2017 season?

I think it just makes me very excited about skiing in general and quite frankly I am little upset it’s the end of the year. I am hungry for more and can’t wait to tackle things in the offseason and hopefully keep the mojo going through the Moomba Masters next year.

What are your plans for the offseason?

I am getting married in December, so things will be a little hectic. But mostly I will focus on healing my body, having fun and cross-training for next season.

Q&A: University World Champ Ambre Franc

French pro Ambre Franc admits that at the beginning of the 2016 season, something was “missing.” Well, after a strong finish that saw her claim a University Worlds title and land a No. 3 ranking in Europe and No. 8 in the world, it’s safe to say she found “it.”

We recently had the chance to talk with Ambre about her year, the big win in Japan and what finally clicked in 2016.

How did you get your start in the sport? 

Water skiing has always been a family sport. My mother and aunt were both on the French national team for years, and my uncle held some European records for a while. I finally tried around ten and never looked back. I really enjoyed it and had the opportunity to train in Florida with some great skiers. Of course, I was late compared to other kids my age, so I had to train harder than others, but it was worth it.

Where do you live and train today? 

After three years in Florida studying at Florida Southern College, where I was able to ski every day anytime I wanted, I decided to come back to Paris to start Nutrition School. I now train during the week in Gravon on my uncle’s lake, Aqu’aventure, and on weekends I usually ski with Vincent Soubiron in Toulouse.

You are part of a growing number of foreign athletes coming to the U.S. to ski on collegiate teams. What was your experience like at Florida Southern College, in particular, and in the U.S. in general? 

Living abroad was a wonderful experience. Facilities for athletes are incredible, especially for water skiers. I enjoyed the whole life over there. Being able to study, train and represent my University was a very rewarding experience.

Last month in Japan you the University World Championships. How special was that to you?  

That is obviously a great achievement that I’m really proud of. Especially since the beginning of my season was so disappointing. Fortunately, I found what I was missing around May: a ski that suits me. The RéV 6 really got me back on track and allowed me to recover my confidence behind the boat. I managed to get a new PB of 3 at 39 twice in a row. The win in Japan was the confirmation of my recovery on that ski, not only because winning always feels special, but this tournament only happens every four years, so it’s a hard title to get.

Who has been inspirational to your success?

My whole entourage has been helpful in my success: my family, friends, boyfriend and coaches. This summer was particularly long with this University Worlds in mid-September, including weeks away from home, switching hotels, lakes, boats and so on. Having people around me to keep me on track was important to me.

What was the most beneficial thing you ever did for your skiing? 

Finding a balance between skiing, training, working out, school, family and time with friends.

What are your goals in the sport? 

Professional events are becoming more important to me lately, but a European or World title is still the target for me.

How about in life? 

I recently started Nutrition school because I want to become a certified nutritionist so I can work with athletes as well as people with diseases like cancer.

Anything else you’d like to mention? 

Go Mocs!